Blog

This is a blog for planetariums and dome theaters, written by planetarians and dome experts from all over our planet. With this forum we want to give the fulldome industry a voice – a forum to share good ideas and experiences between people and venues that are passionate about moving the industry forward. All posts, opinions and comments in this blog are personal and belong to its respective author.

Posts tagged #fulldome:

Sally Brummel, Planetarium Program Manager at Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota | 2016-10-18
The University of Minnesota Bell Museum of Natural History’s ExploraDome debuted 10 years ago and has since inspired over 180,000 students and other learners throughout Minnesota. Sally Brummel has been with the ExploraDome since the beginning and in this blog post shares with us her rewarding experience of presenting in the intimate setting of a portable dome.
Derek Demeter, Director at Emil Buehler Perpetual Trust Planetarium, Seminole State College of Florida | 2016-05-13
The planetarium has always been a gateway to astronomy, but I believe it has become more than that. The whole “the sky is the limit” just got a whole new meaning when it comes to the immersive classroom. In this blog I’ll show you why that is the case!
Johan Sköld, CEO at Sciss | 2016-04-05
One of Sciss’s challenges for this year has been to take a good look at the projector market in order to pick out the very best and high-quality standard projectors for our display configurations. Monitoring the projection market is something we as system integrators do continuously, and I’d like to share some thoughts with you on the current landscape. It’ll be some history, some present-day reporting, and some thoughts on the future.
Mark SubbaRao, Director of the Space Visualization Laboratory at the Adler Planetarium | 2016-02-04
The modern digital planetarium is a powerful data visualization facility. The visualization software Uniview lets you smoothly explore a tremendous array of datasets spanning an incredible range of physical scales, from high resolution maps of Mars to our deepest galaxy surveys. All of which, when used correctly, has great potential to amaze, inform, and most importantly inspire the planetarium going public. Still the opportunity is there to do much, much more.